Don’t Let Creativity Mute Your Message

For the last five years, I’ve written a blog from the point of view of my dog, Mayzie. When we first adopted her, she was fearful and I began writing the blog to keep track of her progress.

At the time, I thought I was probably one of only a handful of pet bloggers. Boy, was I wrong! Turns out, the pet blogging community is huge, filled with people as crazy about their pets as I am.

Since then, I’ve read hundreds of posts by dozens of bloggers. Whether they blog as themselves or their pets, the voice of each is as distinct as the person at the keyboard.

There were certain blogs, though, that I eventually stopped reading altogether: the ones that took the “I Can Has Cheezburger” talk a little too far.

The deliberate misspellings and awkward sentence structures employed by these sites meant I spent too much time trying to translate their message, and not enough time enjoying it.

They may have been creative but they were just too much work to read.

Interestingly, it doesn’t just happen in the blogging community. I’ve seen the same type of device used on some corporate blogs and websites.

It’s not surprising, really. Because of the industry we’re in, it can be super easy to fall into the trap of cutesy language or wordplay. And there’s certainly a time and place for that, depending on your audience and your brand.

However, when it comes to writing marketing copy – the kind that either builds your brand or sells your product or service – clarity trumps creativity every time.

"When writing copy, avoid sacrificing clarity for creativity." ~Amber Carlton, CommaHound.com

Remember, good copywriting:

  • Is easily understood
  • Is concise
  • Avoids jargon and hyperbole
  • Communicates benefits
  • Builds trust
  • Encourages a response or action
  • Never makes the reader feel dumb
  • Never makes the reader work too hard

Does this mean you can’t have fun with your copy? Of course not! People love to do business with companies that have a personality. But let that come through in your tone, voice and visual branding instead of trying too hard to channel Grumpy Cat.

Your turn: Are there any “cutesy” words in our industry that you think are overused? Tell me what they are in the comments.

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